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Deborah

I also loved Ms. Kent's book. I did see her perform quite a few times (including one of her last performances in 1980 or 1981). However, it was towards the end of her career (mid to late 70's), so her technique
wasn't quite where I'm sure it once was. That said, I do recall her ethereal beauty on stage, and how it was impossible to take your eyes off of her.
How fun to see these old programs, with some of my favorite dancers -- Judith Fugate, Heather Watts, JP Frohlich -- still in the corps! I wish I had saved mine too.

Bob

Sadly, even though I started attending NYCB performances in the late 70s, I never actually saw Allegra Kent dance. A few times, she was listed on the program but on each of those occasions someone ended up subbing for her. However, I do remember attending a talk by Edward Villella back in the 80s in which he spoke eloquently about how unique and special a dancer she was.

perky

I never saw her dance on stage either. I have seen snippets of her dance on video. On the Balachine's Ballerina's video is 2 short clips of her dancing the adagio from Symphony In C. She performs it different from any other dancer I've seen dance it. I know "fey" is a word used to describe her dancing but it suits perfectly. Such a unique artist.
I love how honest she is in her book. She knows she's not perfect, even perhaps a bit odd at times yet she doesn't gloss over this. She just presents it with a strait-forward grace that I admire.
I love the paradox of her personality. She's a fragile little flower with a stem of steel. She's a survivor. I adore her.

kathy

I have recollections of Allegra both onstage and off. Before I attended SAB (late '70s) I studied with Allegra at her Scarsdale, NY studio.
I have seen her perform Serenade, Bukagu, Afternoon of a Faun. I wish I could have seen her in "Unanswered Question". The idea of her being unattainable and never touching the ground is perfect.
While I remember her performances being very exciting because she danced like no other; it is Allegra as teacher and friend that has left the most lasting impression.
Wispy, ethereal, other-worldly, profound, smart, strong, so creative, magical, mysterious. All Allegra.

Stuart Aronow

I was so fortunate to have seen Allegra Kent in the 1960's.The image of her gliding across the stage as the Sleepwalker in "La Sonnumbula" was haunting and magical.Also, watching her dance with Edward Villella in "Bugaku" was riveting and so erotic.
Almost 50 years later,these images are alive and never to be forgotten!

fexofenadine

I have recollections of Allegra both onstage and off. Before I attended SAB (late '70s) I studied with Allegra at her Scarsdale, NY studio.
I have seen her perform Serenade, Bukagu, Afternoon of a Faun. I wish I could have seen her in "Unanswered Question". The idea of her being unattainable and never touching the ground is perfect.
While I remember her performances being very exciting because she danced like no other; it is Allegra as teacher and friend that has left the most lasting impression.
Wispy, ethereal, other-worldly, profound, smart, strong, so creative, magical, mysterious. All Allegra.

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